shego:

guys are so terrifying like they will really date a girl as a joke or make bets in their friend groups on who can fuck a girl first or take her virginity and that’s so scary this is a joke to them

(via garlicblogger)

skyexvx:

Confession of a beauty hoarder;
Clean out of unused cruelty free products. Halloween countdown give away consisting of 1st & 2nd gifts, willing to ship worldwide. (May add more prizes)

~you do not have to follow my tumblr~

Rules:
1⃣ one entry per day
2⃣ Reblog the above post
3⃣ Bonus entries available: follow my Instagram (1 bonus entry) regram give away post tag @skyexvx & use #skyexvxgiveaway (1 bonus entry)
{you may enter once a day via tumblr & instagram ^.^}
4⃣ entries close October 31st 5pm AEDT

-1st prize-
•Sukin foaming facial cleanser 50ml
•Aveda style prep smoother 40ml
•Swisse pomegranate hand cream 30ml
•Designer Brands mosaic blush
•Face of Australia concealer in warm
•ELF liquid eyeliner in black
•ELF clear lash & brow mascara
•Concrete minerals Pro Matte Eyeshadow in ‘Bulletproof’ (opened to swatch colour when originally purchased)


-2nd prize-
•Sukin foaming facial cleanser 50ml
• 3 bloodbath lip balms in ‘boo berry vanilla’ ‘horror suckle nectarine’ ‘petrifying pomegranate’

(via kady-xvx)

xfangsx:

urulokid:

millika:

Who’s Alex?
Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

Actually, I’ve studied design and advertising, and I can tell you that the reason people would look at this and immediately assume Alex is the boy is because, quite simply, the boy is the focal point of the ad.
English-speaking readers’ line of sight goes from left to right and up to down. This ad leads the viewer from the words MEET ALEX etc straight to the boy and then over and down to the girl. I didn’t even notice there was a set of parenthesis with words in them in the ad until I looked the fourth time. 
This is a fallacious confirmation bias, as anyone looking at it will assume Alex is the focal point (i.e. The Boy) and then if they’re perceptive they’ll notice the words at the bottom. Aha! Those damn gender stereotypes gotcha again! Except no, because the ad literally forces you to read it as “Alex is the boy” by the visual language and lines of sight. 
A better ad would have been structured from top to bottom instead of left to right, and wouldn’t have pushed the girl, the real subject of the ad (who, by the way, has been VISUALLY PUSHED OUT OF HER RIGHTFUL SPACE ON THE AD BY HER BROTHER) off to the corner as far away from her identifiers as possible. 
Here, I’ll make you a better ad.

Bam. Shitty stock photo but you get the point. If anyone sees this and assumes Alex is the boy, they don’t have the the ad layout to use as an excuse for their internalized gender shittery. Likewise, the ad isn’t actively trying to make you read it a certain way and THEN making you feel guilty for interpreting it the way they designed it to be. 

This is EXACTLY what i was thinking when I saw this pop up.

Also like fuck do the body shop care about misogyny. They just want to sell more shit to socially aware consumers.

xfangsx:

urulokid:

millika:

Who’s Alex?

Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

Actually, I’ve studied design and advertising, and I can tell you that the reason people would look at this and immediately assume Alex is the boy is because, quite simply, the boy is the focal point of the ad.

English-speaking readers’ line of sight goes from left to right and up to down. This ad leads the viewer from the words MEET ALEX etc straight to the boy and then over and down to the girl. I didn’t even notice there was a set of parenthesis with words in them in the ad until I looked the fourth time. 

This is a fallacious confirmation bias, as anyone looking at it will assume Alex is the focal point (i.e. The Boy) and then if they’re perceptive they’ll notice the words at the bottom. Aha! Those damn gender stereotypes gotcha again! Except no, because the ad literally forces you to read it as “Alex is the boy” by the visual language and lines of sight. 

A better ad would have been structured from top to bottom instead of left to right, and wouldn’t have pushed the girl, the real subject of the ad (who, by the way, has been VISUALLY PUSHED OUT OF HER RIGHTFUL SPACE ON THE AD BY HER BROTHER) off to the corner as far away from her identifiers as possible. 

Here, I’ll make you a better ad.

image

Bam. Shitty stock photo but you get the point. If anyone sees this and assumes Alex is the boy, they don’t have the the ad layout to use as an excuse for their internalized gender shittery. Likewise, the ad isn’t actively trying to make you read it a certain way and THEN making you feel guilty for interpreting it the way they designed it to be. 

This is EXACTLY what i was thinking when I saw this pop up.

Also like fuck do the body shop care about misogyny. They just want to sell more shit to socially aware consumers.

(via xthegirlwithkaleidoscopeeyesx)

hoodjab:

stoned-levi:

There’s nothing wrong with girls who do a lot to maintain their appearance and there’s nothing wrong with girls who do very little to maintain their appearance but there’s something extremely fucking wrong with girls who think it’s okay to judge girls for doing either or. Shut your crusty ass up for 10 seconds and let a bitch live.

Let a bitch live

(via xthegirlwithkaleidoscopeeyesx)

We found that, upon exposure to sexist humor, men higher in sexism discriminated against women by allocating larger funding cuts to a women’s organization than they did to other organizations.

We also found that, in the presence of sexist humor, participants believed the other participants would approve of the funding cuts to women’s organizations. We believe this shows that humorous disparagement creates the perception of a shared standard of tolerance of discrimination that may guide behavior when people believe others feel the same way.

The research indicates that people should be aware of the prevalence of disparaging humor in popular culture, and that the guise of benign amusement or “it’s just a joke” gives it the potential to be a powerful and widespread force that can legitimize prejudice in our society

Thomas E. Ford, professor of psychology at Western Carolina University (via baebees)

Sexist (and racist and so forth) humor isn’t about hurt feelings. It’s about harm

It’s not “just a joke.”

(via vixyish)

I

(via commiekinkshamer)

wollipyos:

If you’re straight you’re straight, you can’t get more straight. If you’re gay though you can get gayer every day if you work at it. That’s the fun part about being gay. You’re constantly moving past your limits.

(via celestialqueer)